Highlights

Annika von Hausswolff (1967-), The Memory of my Mother’s Underwear Transformed into a Flameproof Drape, 2003

© Annika von Hausswolff (1967-), The Memory of my Mother's Underwear Transformed into a Flameproof Drape, 2003.

The Swedish artist Annika von Hausswolff has attracted international attention with works that break new ground for photographic art. Both in terms of their subject matter and with their original combination of photos and three-dimensional objects.

The dreams, memories and meanings of an object
In these works, Annika von Hausswolff points out how absolutely elementary or everyday objects can hold dreams, memories, and meanings that reach far beyond the object itself. She wants us to discover that even very familiar and unremarkable things offer scope for new insights and that we can broaden our spheres of cognition by enhancing the way we perceive the world around us.

Everyday objects as unreal
In Annika von Hausswolff’s large and ultra-sharp photographs, familiar objects such as a perfectly ordinary radiator, a bright red venetian blind, or a swept-up pile of dust bunnies, dead flies, and cigarette butts take on an unaccustomed monumentality and clarity. Paradoxically, the everyday objects suddenly seem unreal. As though they belong to a different world.

Childhood memories
The work The Memory of my Mother’s Underwear Transformed into a Flameproof Drape is a large, salmonpink curtain hung on the world. It refers to her childhood memories of exploring her mother’s underwear drawers and the feel of the skincoloured synthetic fabric. The way this fabric represents the mother’s body is an important point to be borne in mind when interpreting the work.

Updated: 15.oct.2014
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