Exhibitions

Exhibitions 2006

Bjørn Nørgaard: Venus mirrors - mirrors Venus
05.07 2005 - 01.01 2006
Jonathan Meese and Tal R i x-rummet: Mother
09.10 2005 - 08.01 2006
"Highlights"
18.03 2005 - 14.05 2006
"Rembrandt? The Master and his Workshop"
04.02 2006 - 14.05 2006
Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen in x-rummet: "EgoShow"
18.02 2006 - 14.05 2006
"French Master Drawings"
12.05.2006 - 08.10 2006
Jeppe Hein in x-rummet: "Invisible Maze"
10.06 2006 - 08.10 2006

Bjørn Nørgaard: "Venus mirrors - mirrors Venus"

05.07. 2005 - 01.01 2006

Jonathan Meese and Tal R i x-rummet: "Mother"

09.10 2005 - 08.01 2006

"Highlights"

18.03 2005 - 14.05 2006

The absolutely best works from the Collections were shown in a new challenging hanging. In continuation of the thorough fire prevention of the Museums old building the hanging was presented in the new building. The hanging presented a comprehensive extract of art in 700 years - from Mantegna, Cranach, Lippi, Lorenzetti and Rubens over Abildgaard, Eckersberg, Hammershøi, Krøyer og Willumsen to Picasso, Matisse, Braque, Mortensen, Nolde, Jorn, Weie, Kirkeby and the contemporary art.

The exhibition marked a break with the display principles of Modernism, harking back instead to earlier salon displays, similar to what audiences met when the museum first opened its doors in 1896. More than 1000 works hang from wall to ceiling in dense sequences, but this time the setting and the content of the works were very different. This was the first time that the full range of the museum collections were presented in the new building’s light and spacious rooms. Here, the older art shaded a completely different kind of light, and the more recent works were formed to communicate with – and against – each other to a greater extent than ever before.

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"Rembrandt? The Master and his Workshop"

04.02 2006 - 14.05 2006

The 400th anniversary of the birth of Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-69) was celebrated at Statens Museum for Kunst with the most comprehensive exhibition ever presented in Denmark about the miller's son from Leiden who became one of the most important painters art history has ever seen.

The exhibition also directed attention to the group of artists around Rembrandt. Many of these artists – not least Rembrandt's students – have long represented a largely forgotten chapter of Dutch Golden-Age art. Studies from the last few decades have shown that works formerly attributed to Rembrandt were in fact done by his students, sparking a considerable rise in interest in these artists. The exhibition included fine examples of the kind of copies and free variations on Rembrandt's own paintings which his students produced at his workshop in Amsterdam.

The exhibition revealed the results of the studies carried out in the museum collections in recent years. Statens Museum for Kunst has studied those of its paintings that have hitherto been rejected as Rembrandts. This new research unearthed sensational news: The museum owns two paintings by the Dutch master.

Read more about the studies of the paintings

Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen in x-rummet: "EgoShow"

18.02 2006 - 14.05 2006

The stage curtain is drawn back. You step directly onto the stage where a sun sings cabaret tunes, tripping on its own ego, and a dancing cockerel raps to a techno beat.

The Danish artist Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen (b.1970) performed a poetic dissection of contemporary egotism and macho posturing. With great curiosity, she navigated the interspaces between different kinds of realities: Between the perfect staging of music videos and the raw reality of documentaries, between personal, confessionals and political, social commitment.

The exhibition presented two all-new video works, EgoShow and CockFight, by Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen, positing them within a larger installation within the x-rummet.

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"French Master Drawings"

05.2006 - 08.10 2006

The exhibition offered a rare insight into the Museum's rich collection of drawings and watercolours by French masters from the 19th and 20th centuries. Spanning the range from Ingres, Manet, Moreau, Toulouse-Lautrec and the emergent Impressionism in Degas, Cézanne and Gauguin to 20th century icons such as Matisse, Picasso, Picabia, and Giacometti, the exhibition provided a nuanced picture of one of the most intense and fast-paced epochs within art history

The exhibition gave a summary of French-related art ranging from the soul-searching figurations of the Romantic period to the full-blown Modernism of the abstract movements just after World War II. It formed a narrative of 150 years of art that never fully grows roots and which, for that very reason, was saturated by an intensity and innovation without parallel. Throughout the display, the works appeared to be part of a prolonged, almost fierce hunt for originality and momentum, an implacable urge to keep up with or, even better, to pre-empt and create the signs and shapes of the times.

Jeppe Hein in x-rummet: "Invisible Maze"

10.06 2006 - 08.10 2006

Deceptive emptiness awaited the visitors to the x-rummet. A visual deceit which warned us, that the artist had suspended and disabled our favourite sensory tool, the sense of sight.

Like the proverbial mad inventor, Jeppe Hein had created an invisible labyrinth that only materialised as we moved around in it. Visitors were equipped with a set of digital headphones operated by infrared rays that caused them to vibrate every time you bumped into one of the labyrinth's virtual walls. The exhibition was both a minimalist and spectacular playground. It abolished traditional rituals and conditions applying to exhibition venues, art audiences, and works of art.

The labyrinth structure spanned a total of six different variants, all of them referring to authentic labyrinths from our common cultural history. From the famous medieval labyrinth in Chartres to Stanley Kubrick's fateful dead end from the film The Shining to Pac-Man.


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